Has Your Dog Been Diagnosed with a CCL Injury?

TPLO Surgery

TPLO surgery is used to treat most cranial cruciate ligament injuries. Our expertise and precision helps ensure for your dog’s full recovery. Our orthopedic surgeons, 24/7 monitoring, advanced surgical equipment, and dedication ensure not only restored stability but also a quicker and more reliable recovery process. We are focused on compassionate care and a return to normal activities for your furry friend.

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What is TPLO Surgery?

What is a Cranial Cruciate Ligament Injury?

The cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) is one of the major ligaments in a dog's knee joint, similar to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans. A cranial cruciate ligament injury, also known as a CCL tear or rupture, is a common orthopedic injury in dogs, particularly in larger breeds or those with certain anatomical predispositions.

What are some symptoms of a CCL Injury?

When the CCL is injured, it can lead to instability and lameness in the affected leg. This injury can appear suddenly, such as a sudden twist or turn, or it can develop gradually over time due to degeneration of the ligament. Dogs with a CCL injury typically show signs of limping, pain, difficulty bearing weight on the affected leg, and swelling around the knee joint. Without proper treatment, which is typically surgery, a CCL injury can lead to chronic pain, arthritis, and decreased mobility in the affected limb.

What are some options to treat this injury?

Although bracing the joint and conservative management of pain and inflammation through medication can help, often the best course of treatment is surgery—specifically a Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy, or TPLO surgery.

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What is Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) surgery?

Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) surgery is a common procedure used to treat cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injuries in dogs, particularly in larger breeds or those with active lifestyles. During TPLO surgery, the surgeon alters the angle of the top portion of the tibia (the shin bone) to stabilize the knee joint and compensate for the lack of support from the torn ligament.

The procedure involves making a curved cut in the tibia and rotating the top portion of the bone to achieve a level plateau. This alteration changes the mechanics of the knee joint, removing the need for the cranial cruciate ligament and providing stability during weight-bearing activities. After the bone is repositioned, it is stabilized using specialized implants such as plates and screws.

Over time, the bone heals in its new position, creating a stable knee joint that allows the dog to bear weight and move more comfortably. TPLO surgery aims to restore stability to the knee joint, alleviate pain, and prevent the progression of arthritis. It typically results in a faster recovery than other surgical techniques, allowing dogs to return to normal activities more quickly. Click on the video to learn more about how the actual surgery is performed.

Understanding TPLO Surgery

Fixed Pricing

At CVETS, we understand the financial challenges involved in treating a CCL injury, particularly with TPLO surgery costs. To make care more accessible and straightforward, we’ve introduced a comprehensive fixed pricing of $4000 covering everything from the initial examination to surgery and follow-up visits. We also offer flexible payment choices, such as a convenient payment plan starting with $2000 upfront and $250 per month for eight months.

Our aim is to ensure that more furry friends can receive advanced care, while alleviating the financial strain on their owners.

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Testimonial

“Dr. LeFloch, I wanted to thank you for operating on my dog, Pearl, last October. She’s doing great and was cleared for hunting in December. She loves accompanying me on my duck hunting trips in the swamps, and I’m grateful for the second chance you gave her. If you’re ever in the Hartsville area, my wife and I would love to see you and show you how well Pearl is doing”

-Mike S

Recovery

The recovery process for Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) surgery typically involves several stages, each crucial for the successful healing and rehabilitation of your dog’s knee joint:

  1. Immediate Post-Operative Care: Following TPLO surgery, your dog will likely stay one night at CVETS for monitoring and initial pain management. Pain medications, antibiotics and mild sedatives are typically prescribed to manage discomfort, help with rest and prevent infection.
  2. Strict Rest: In the first few weeks after surgery rest is essential to allow the surgical site to heal properly. This means limiting activity to short leash walks for bathroom breaks only and preventing jumping, running, and rough play.
  3. Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation: CVETS orthopedic surgeons may also recommend physical therapy exercises to help strengthen the muscles surrounding the knee joint, improve the range of motion and speed healing. These may include passive range of motion exercises, laser therapy, gentle massage, underwater treadmill and controlled exercises to increase activity levels gradually.
  4. Gradual Activity Increase: Over the next several weeks, your dog’s activity level will gradually increase under your guidance. This typically involves slowly increasing the duration and intensity of leash walks and controlled exercises while continuing to avoid high-impact activities.
  5. Monitoring and Follow-Up Visits: All patients are rechecked two weeks and eight following surgery before being allowed to return to regular activity.
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Meet our Surgeons

Dr. Mike Schlicksup, DACVS-SA, MBA

Position: Veterinary Surgeon
Categories: Leadership, Surgery

Dr. Mike Schlicksup received his doctorate of veterinary medicine from Ross University in 2007 where he graduated salutatorian. Following graduation he completed a one year small animal internship and three year surgical residency at the University of Pennsylvania. Upon finishing the residency program Dr. Schlicksup became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. He remained on staff at the University of Pennsylvania helping train students, interns and surgical residents for the next 2 years. For the past 7 years he worked as a staff surgeon at a facility in Charleston, SC. Dr. Schlicksup’s interests include wound therapy, minimally invasive surgery (arthroscopy & laparoscopy) and joint replacement. He has written numerous journal articles and book chapters on topics that include; brachycephalic airway disease, vascular stenting, adrenal gland surgery, cruciate ligament disease and middle ear disease. In 2011 his research was recognized at the American College of Veterinary Surgeons symposium. Dr. Schlicksup is the co-owner of CVETS with Dr. Tracy Schlicksup.  Their goal was to open a specialty hospital in the Columbia area that was focused on the client experience while practicing the highest level of medicine.

 

Dr. Mike Schlicksup, DACVS-SA, MBA

Veterinary Surgeon

Dr. Collin Wolff, DACVS-SA

Position: Veterinary Surgeon
Categories: Surgery

Dr. Collin Wolff received both his bachelor’s and veterinary degrees from Cornell University, where he was recognized for academic excellence graduating summa cum laude and with distinction in research honors. Dr. Wolff went on to advance his clinical training by completing two one-year veterinary internships: the first a general small animal internship rotating through medicine, surgery, and other specialty services at the Animal Medical Center in New York City and the second a surgical internship at the Dallas Veterinary Surgical Center. His formal training in small animal surgery culminated in a three-year academic residency at Texas A&M University, following which Dr. Wolff successfully completed all requirements of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and attained diplomate status as a board-certified veterinary surgeon. Dr. Wolff has published numerous articles on basic science research as well as clinical research. During his residency, the ACVS Foundation awarded Dr. Wolff a competitive research grant to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococci, a multi-drug resistant bacteria increasingly implicated in surgical site infections, in dogs with orthopedic disease.

Dr. Collin Wolff, DACVS-SA

Veterinary Surgeon

Dr. Samantha Sedgwick, DACVAA

Position: Veterinary Anesthesiologist
Categories: Anesthesiology, Surgery

Dr. Samantha Sedgwick grew up riding horses in the US Virgin Islands, on the lovely island of St. Croix. She obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in Animal Science at the University of Tennessee while participating in two Division I sports track and rowing. Dr. Sedgwick went on to attain her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Ross University in 2015. Following graduation, Dr. Sedgwick completed her rotating internship at the world-renowned Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital, where she honed her anesthesia and analgesia skills under the tutelage of the eminent equine anesthesiologist, Dr. John Hubbell. Her love of anesthesia spurred her pursuit of a residency in the Section of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine at Cornell University Hospital for Animals, which she completed in 2021. During her residency, Dr. Sedgwick published work on blood pressure monitoring and alveolar recruitment using critical care ventilators, both in canine patients; she also co-authored a chapter on regional anesthesia for the textbook Equine Dentistry and Oral Surgery. Her clinical interests include pain management, regional anesthesia, stabilization of polytraumas under anesthesia, and the challenge of exotic zoo wildlife anesthesia. In her spare time, Dr. Sedgwick enjoys spending time hiking with her husband and riding her two horses, Lu and Sea B.

 

Dr. Samantha Sedgwick, DACVAA

Veterinary Anesthesiologist

Dr. Marielle LeFloch, DACVS-SA

Position: Veterinary Surgeon
Categories: Surgery

Dr. Marielle LeFloch grew up in Poughkeepsie, NY. She attended the University of Missouri-Columbia for undergrad and then graduated veterinary school at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 2016. She then completed a rotating internship, an emergency surgery internship, and then a surgical residency at Ocean State Veterinary Specialists in Rhode Island. She is moving with her fiancé, Phil, 2 cats, and a small group of crested geckoes. She is very excited to be able to explore all the beautiful parks in South Carolina and is looking forward to the warmer weather!

Dr. Marielle LeFloch, DACVS-SA

Veterinary Surgeon

Dr. Ashley Schick, Board-Eligible Veterinary Surgeon

Position: Veterinary Surgeon
Categories: Surgery

Dr. Ashley Schick was born in Connecticut and raised in Raleigh, North Carolina. She earned a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Georgia, prior to receiving her Doctorate of Veterinary Medicine degree from North Carolina State University. Following a small animal rotating internship at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, Dr. Schick completed a surgical internship at the Veterinary Specialty Hospital of San Diego in California. She then returned to the University of Georgia for a small animal surgery residency.

Dr. Ashley Schick, Board-Eligible Veterinary Surgeon

Veterinary Surgeon

Dr. Erica Dunphy, CVMMP, CVA

Position: Veterinarian Rehabilitation
Categories: Emergency, Rehabilitation, Surgery

Dr. Dunphy is a veterinarian with a passion for integrative medicine and rehabilitation. She grew up in Poughkeepsie, NY, and earned her undergraduate degree from the University of New England in 2009. She then pursued her veterinary degree at Ross University, graduating in 2013. She gained experience in integrative medicine and rehab at an integrative practice in Charlotte, NC, where she worked for over 5 years. She also obtained certifications in diagnostic musculoskeletal ultrasound and Veterinary Medical Manipulation (VMM). In 2023, she moved to Blythewood, SC with her husband and three children along with two dogs, and a cat. She joined CVETS in 2024 to lead the rehab department and offer integrative services such as acupuncture, spinal manipulation, and holistic medicine. She loves spending time with her family, enjoying outdoor activities, and exercising. She is eager to share her knowledge and skills with CVETS and its clients.

Dr. Erica Dunphy, CVMMP, CVA

Veterinarian Rehabilitation

For a Quicker and More Reliable Recovery for Your Pet’s CCL Injury, Trust CVETS

If your beloved canine companion is suffering from a CCL injury, trust the experts at CVETS to guide you through the journey to recovery. With years of experience and thousands of successful orthopedic surgeries under their belt, the team at CVETS is dedicated to restoring stability and bringing back a great quality of life for your dog. From advanced surgical techniques to compassionate care, we’re here to provide the highest level of treatment and support. Contact us today to learn more about how we can help your furry friend get back on their feet.